How to be a seriously rad motherfucker

When my last post went viral, a few things happened.

First, I got a lot of attention. That post has been shared on Facebook over 2000 times so far, and it pretty much blew the roof off of my traffic stats.

Second, it put me into uncharted territory. Normally when you write a post, you’re writing with home field advantage, to people who thought enough of you at one point to subscribe to your feed or bookmark you. But when something goes viral, you get a lot of people showing up at your door who have no clue who you are. Those people haven’t been around to see what else you’ve done, and they won’t automatically get your jokes. They won’t always sense your sarcasm. They’ll read what you say out of context, and oftentimes, they just plain won’t like you.

The last thing that happened was that a few people asked me how, specifically, to do epic shit.

All of this — the influx of new eyes and the apparent implication that I’m the Zeus of Epic, here to drive messages of epicness into the hearts of the lame on gilded lightning bolts — led to some uncharacteristic comments and responses.

Some people said: Epic is too epic. It’s cliche. Why do you feel the need to show everyone how amazing you are? Sounds like you’re having a mid-life crisis.

Now, don’t get me wrong. Feedback is feedback, and you can’t please everyone. (In fact, if you only get positive responses to what you do or create or write, that’s a sure sign that you’re playing only home games at your home field in front of your home crowd. Getting pushback is good. If you’re never rejected, you need to push harder until at least a few people have a problem with you. That applies to just about everything.)

So it’s totally fine that some people didn’t like the post. But what gets me is that I suspect at least some of those folks didn’t understand the post. Or rather, they understood it, but were distracted by the fact that it didn’t speak their language.

So what does all of this have to do with becoming a seriously rad motherfucker?

Well, I’m glad you asked.

Becoming a bitchin’ ultimately awesome shit-kicking badass just like Eleanor fucking Roosevelt fuck yeah

I think that at least some of the people who had an issue with the “epic” angle were having an allergic reaction to the word “epic.”

Everyone who’s seen Mountain Dew commercials has formed their own opinions about the subset of people who want to be EXTREME! or RAD! or EPIC! Often these perceptions aren’t great. My home crowd thinks the idea of being FUCKING EPICALLY BADASS is FUCKING EPICALLY BADASS, but most people outside of that group think it’s naive and stupid and annoying.

That group, you tell them that you want to be EPIC! and they roll their eyes because they see that you’re clearly part of the Fight Club generation. It’s obvious that you were born too late or too early or to the wrong parents (and certainly too lazy) to change the world, so you think your choices are to destroy that world or to one-up it. That group, they hear “epic” and they think you’re using a word with a big meaning to make up for the smallness and meaningless of the world you see around you.

The group that doesn’t like a word like “epic,” they think it’s like homophobes who are violent because they’re secretly gay. The thing you hate about yourself, you must annihilate. We “epic” people are clearly empty inside, so we pretend to think big and pretend to be more, to demand that life give us a bigger experience, in HD and surround sound.

But, look.

If you don’t like the idea of being “epic” or “awesome,” then just change the words. Be “outstanding” instead. I’m a Tony Robbins fan as well as a super radical naked heli-ski extreme cliffjumper on fire Gen X epic badass, so maybe that’ll work for you.

Outstanding and epic are both about not settling.

Outstanding and epic are both about finding that thing that you think you should do, and then doing it despite all of the roadblocks between you and the goal.

Outstanding and epic are both about allowing yourself to have that crisis everyone accuses you of having. You can wait until traditional mid-life to have your crisis, or you can have it now, at whatever age you are. Personally, I have these crises all the time. I’ve had them since I was old enough to realize that I wasn’t the center of everything. I have them every time I look at my kids and wonder how they’re getting so old so fast. I have them every time I pass the scene of an accident, or when someone gets cancer. I have them when I remember hanging out with my mom as a kid, and realize that at the time of the memory, she was younger than I am now. I even had one recently when I watched Apocalypse Now and saw how young Martin Sheen was in it, and how good-looking he was, and how immortal and powerful he probably felt.

Then, when you encounter your crisis, outstanding and epic are both about taking that feedback from your internal compass and adjusting your path. People who are outstanding and people who are epic won’t buy a sports car when they turn 40 to prove to themselves that they’re young. Instead, they’ll consider it proven that they’re getting older. The message they’ll take from their crisis is that life is ending a little every day, and with that knowledge, they’ll decide that now is the time, and the thing they know they should do, they’ll do.

Whether you like the Fight Club model or the Tony Robbins model, both amount to doing things that are amazing, that change lives, that shape what is shapable during this short time we’re going to be here.

So how to do you become outstanding? How do you be epic? How do you be a seriously rad motherfucker? Well, Eleanor Roosevelt, who was a total punk rock surfer extreme motherfucker, said it this way:

“You must do the thing you think you cannot do.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

And I’ll just say it in slightly different words: You’ve got to be brave.

Stop waiting for someone to tell you how to be amazing

So you say you need a roadmap to awesome? No you don’t.

You know what you should do. You don’t need me or anyone else to tell you how to become You 2.0. If you don’t think you see it, that’s because you’re not used to trusting your senses. You’re used to trusting a paint-by-number world, where someone says, “People do this,” and so you do it.

What you should do is there, right in front of your face. The problem is that it may be too big and too obvious. It’s like if a kid came up to you and said, “Where is the world?” and you pointed all around you, at everything. And the kid would look confused and say, “But where?”

Stop looking for an answer and instead just look. You know what would be an outstanding thing to do. You know what would be amazing. You know what would be really epic, if you could pull it off.

… if you could pull it off.

And see that last bit — the bit about pulling it off? That’s what stops you. That’s what makes you unable to see the amazing thing right in front of you.

Most people, they have a series of possibilities in their lives that they don’t see as possibilities because there’s some big “… but it’d never work” or “… but there’s no way” attached to it. And that right there is at the root of most people’s inability to be epic, or amazing, or awesome, or outstanding, or whatever other word suits you.

Most people think that they’re unable to do that big thing. And they think that because it’s impossible — because they’ll surely fail — then doing it wouldn’t be amazing. Most people are under the delusion that if they fail, they haven’t been or are not being amazing.

But that’s bullshit.

To be amazing, you need to be brave. You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Whether you succeed or fail is immaterial. You know how people always say that it’s the thought that counts? Well, it’s true. Amazing is an attitude, not a set of accomplishments. But the cool part? If you keep up with the attitudes, eventually you’ll get some of the accomplishments too.

My son, who’s six, only likes to do things he’s good at. He’s good at drawing, so he does a ton of drawing. By contrast, he’s not good at baseball, so he’s not interested. I keep trying to tell him that if he keeps working on those things that he’s not good at but that he otherwise seems to enjoy, he’ll get better at them and the achievement will be so sweet, but you can’t convince a six year old of that. Trying to do so is nearly as difficult as trying to convince an adult of the same thing.

Do the thing that interests you that you’re terrible at.

Take the chance on what you want to do but that you think you will fail at.

Attempt to master the skill that feels utterly impossible.

Do the thing that terrifies you.

The very best things in life — the very best feelings you can experience, and the most epic things you can do — are those things that scare you shitless because they’re so hard, so impossible, so utterly undoable. There is nothing epic about doing what you are good at or about making a sure bet. Outstanding things require a very serious possibility of failure. Often, it requires actual failure, usually over and over and over again.

That’s what makes life such an adventure. Are we having fun yet?

What scares you?

I have a project right now, that I’m just starting, that I’ve said publicly is either going to be over-the-top amazing or the stupidest fucking idea ever conceived by anyone in the history of time.

I’ve been asked to help with another project that is way, way, way, way bigger than what I’m used to or comfortable with. Just thinking about it scares me. I also don’t know where to start. The project I’m talking about, it has a billion little loose ends and a billion things to keep track of, and I have no clue how they’ll all end up getting handled.

This fall, we’ve pretty much decided that Austin won’t go to first grade. Instead, we’re going to do some form of unschooling at home. I want him to learn from experience instead of textbooks. I want him to learn to solve problems instead of memorize answers. I want some degree of control over which peers exert peer pressure on him. But this is uncharted water, and we have many, many more questions than we have answers.

The best things you can do in life will scare the shit out of you. If you’re not at least a little scared about something you’re doing, you’re not doing anything outstanding. That’s not a judgment; plenty of people enjoy the middle of existence. I am not one of them. If you aren’t one of them either, then I suggest you find that thing that’s right in front of your face that you think you can’t do and start to do it. Let it scare you. Embrace the uncertainty and fear.

Step outside of your box, and be brave.

If you think the advice to “be epic” is too Generation X, you’re missing the point. Look at the most amazing things that have ever been done in the past and ask yourself whether the person who did them was likely to have been uncertain or afraid. Ask yourself if, given the fear, the real reason the thing was done was to be extreme or radical or compensate for a shallow crisis, or if it was because it was something that was difficult but that the person felt needed doing.

I don’t think that Rosa Parks set out to be epic. I don’t think she said, “I’m going to ride at the front of this bus because it’ll be FUCKING AWESOME, and then they’ll put me on a can of Red Bull.”

I don’t think Mother Theresa did what she did because it was totally rad.

I doubt that at the first Continental Congress, George Washington said, “Fuck the British. This new country is going to be so IN YOUR FACE!”

Too noble? Well, the same goes for Olympic champions, captains of business, ultrarunners, monks, authors, and anyone who’s ever faced adversity, trials, panic, ridicule, or worse while pursuing something that they felt they should do, be it selfish or selfless.

Being epic is about being brave. It’s about doing impossible things for the sake of doing them. Whether your epic actions help others directly (Mother Theresa) or appear to just help you (Olympians), the truth is that every brave act helps someone else. Every amazing thing attempted in the face of fear raises the bar for all of humanity. When you do something that scares you, it shows other people that fear can be challenged and that nobody needs to be its prisoner. Even if your action itself is all about you, your struggle to do it serves as an example.

Roger Bannister’s 4-minute mile was an accomplishment for him, but it showed the world that something that everyone knew was impossible was possible after all.

It may look like lawyer Brian Shaughnessy is crusading for rights for all disabled people, but really his quest was to help himself and his son. And yet, what he does for his own family ends up helping all disabled people.

If the epic thing you do is to leave an abusive marriage, you show others in your situation that if they’re brave, they can do the same thing. If you start a business, you show your friends that it’s possible. And if you fail? You’ve still shown them that it can be attempted, that at least one person wasn’t afraid to try.

Every outstanding action — even a botched one — has positive repercussions.

If I could geek out a little, there was an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation where a ship from the past, through a glitch in time, comes into the Enterprise’s present and causes the “correct” present to go to hell. Turns out the ship was supposed to have been destroyed in a hopeless battle in the past, but escaped to the present. In the end, the crew of the doomed ship decides to return to the past, even knowing they have no chance of success. Why? Because they’d die defending a rival base — a noble act that meant enough even in failure to mend relations and prevent a decades-long war.

Want to be amazing? Want to be epic? Want to be outstanding?

All right. Here’s your recipe:

Look at what you feel you should do, what you know would change your life and the lives of others for the better. Let it overwhelm you. Let it terrify you. Let it mock you with its impossibility and insurmountableness. Let others tell you it can’t be done. Let your friends and family call you stupid or foolish or naive. Let fear chatter in your ear and erode your confidence and your ability to think rationally.

Then, do it anyway.


Comments

  1. Keith Moyer says:

    Awesome post and so true.

  2. Fuck yeah! I totally understand the EPIC nature of this post, Johnny. Just wrote something along the same lines (with less F-words) called, Be a Chef (not a Cook). Oh and there’s a Manifesto that goes along with it.

    I’ve also got a project that I’m launching in the next few weeks that (like yours) is either going to be the best thing ever, or totally suck eggs. It scares me, but in a good way. Kind of like getting on a roller coaster. You KNOW the ride is going to pull some serious Gs and you’ll be nauseous by the time you’re done, but WOW.

    Oh, and thanks for helping people understand Ms. Eleanor, too.

  3. Keith Moyer says:

    Also, great comment by Ayn Rand…I am reading “Atlas Shrugged” now and it speaks to me in so many ways.

    • Johnny says:

      Easily one of my favorites, and also the only book I know with a single quote that goes for like 50 pages!

  4. This advice is spot on. The biggest secret to being epic is to use fear and resistance as a compass. When something scares you, your compass is pointing directly at the thing you MUST do. Thanks for this post!

  5. I MOSTLY love this post. However, I disagree that your son should play baseball because he isn’t good at it. StrengthsFinder 2.0 had an excellent point that basically said we’re all better off when we play towards our strenghts rather than try to improve our weaknesses.

    That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t stretch ourselves – or not accomplish “epic shit”, just that the epic shit we should try is in lign with our inner strengths.

    • Johnny says:

      Good point, and I was actually a bit afraid I might have come across as saying that, but it’s a bit different around here. He’ll actually enjoy things but then give up because they’re hard. I agree with you in cases where he wouldn’t actually like things — i.e. doing them just because they’re difficult.

      I do still think that there’s a ton of value, though, for most people, in trying to do things that are NOT in their strengths. If we only do what we’re good at, how can we grow and become more?

      • Mike Carlson says:

        I think developing our weaknesses, or even training those things we’re not interested in, has tangible value.

        For instance, I never had a big interest in writing. In fact, I didn’t enjoy writing one bit. But writing is the main tool for getting ideas across in the internet generation. Practicing my writing, getting good feedback about it, allowed me to get to the point where I even kind of enjoy it.

        I don’t like fixing things around the house. But teaching myself auto mechanics, electrical, plumbing and so on, allowed me to stay home and raise my kids on a lot smaller income. I didn’t have to make an “Epic” income from an uber product launch, rather I could be “good enough” with my writing skills to bring in an income that allows me to be with my kids, which was important to me.

        Sure if I “loved” writing, and marketing, and networking, well then I could surely work with my passions only, and make enough to stay home AND pay a mechanic, or maybe buy a new car every year. But that is not exactly my angle in the ‘internet” world. I’m more of an idea guy 🙂

        Anyway, when I can write as well as JBT I’ll be happy. And that’s my last point. Some people can dig out the gold nuggets in anything. When I come here, I know I can always get a lesson in good writing internet style regardless of the actual content (which I think is usually very good) but some people like to look for negative things and be critical. I think it is the mindset of “How can I benefit from…,….” vs. the mindset of “What can I find wrong with….” that might separate the “real” epic from the not so epic people.

  6. Thor says:

    Quite probably the most enjoyable yet challenging bit of writing I’ve read from you – Awesome…
    Nae, “epic” work.
    Thank you JT!

  7. Emily Rose says:

    Johnny, This is exactly what I am going through in my life, the last few years have been overcoming one fear after another, leaving my abuse ex-husband, living on my own, moving to a new state, battling my own mind (bipolar), starting college when i was 26, and now trying to start a business and through it all I;ve been terrified, I’m still terrified, there are so many things up against me, but I’ve become sick of the fear itself and I want to move past it so that I can make a difference in the world. Whether that difference be small or big, who knows what will happen, but I am taking one step at a time to get there.

    Thanks again for an inspiring post and for the interview we did, I was so fearful, but now that I’ve done it I believe that I can do more and be better each time, how awesome is that?

  8. I love all the fucking swearing in this fucking post.

    (Seriously, I love the message.)

  9. Any post that starts with Ayn Rand is a great post in my book!

    I love her and in fact, Atlas Shrugged iS my Fav book.

    Totally agree with the message

  10. illana says:

    OK, on your last (and apparently viral… congrats on that, btw) post, I commented that I hate the word ‘epic’. Funny thing is, I like the concept… I just wish there was more words in the fucking English language. I think I’m more tired of the throngs of people that declare their epic-ness and display it by working in middle management and whining about their lack of success. I mean, they told everyone how epic they are… that’s enough, right?!?!

    But, you have officially restored my epic love of epic-ness. Rock it, baby, rock it.

    And I am pretty sure that Mother Teresa did, in fact, endeavor to be rad. I mean roaming around India is all the rage with the Rad-Crew these days. She MUST have wanted to be rad.0..

    • Johnny says:

      Yeah, I think the semantics are tricky, because there are few things more obnoxious than someone saying “epic” when they mean “pretty neat.” Or when people say “epic” and then do nothing. But it’s all just words… you know what I mean!

      (There’s a post out there somewhere about overuse of the word “awesome” that’s similar. The author says that “awesome” has been robbed of all meaning because people use it to mean just about everything. Which is awesome.)

  11. Delisa says:

    Hells Yeah! This is what I try to get across to my reader or clients. I mostly think I fail at it but I keep trying.

    We unschool our three children. They have never been to public school. They learn things even when I think they aren’t learning anything. People say hateful things to us about making the choice to do this. Be brave. There is a lot of helpful info online.

    • Johnny says:

      I suspect that with a lot of folks, we’ll simply say “homeschool.” It makes the issue go away for a lot of people. 🙂

  12. Two things:
    You are my new favorite blogger. I loved the do epic shit post, but this one hit me on a “but it will be too scary, and people won’t get it, and I’ll probably fail” day. You are definitely rad, and I love the message. Please keep it coming 🙂

    On a more practical note, I’m going to give you a little unsolicited homeschooling advice. Background: I have 5 children and have been homeschooling for 12 years. Two are now in college. They were unschooled, with a little eclectic homeschooling thrown in for good measure. After they had been in college for a year, I sat them down and asked if they would change anything about the way they were homeschooled. Both said that they wished we had used a semi-formal math program.
    With the younger three, we do Singapore Math a few days a week. Singapore is not drill and kill, it spends a lot of time on “practical” math (word problems, measurement, etc.) and it’s easy to use.
    Just a heads up from someone who’s been at it a while 🙂

    • Johnny says:

      Thank you for the math advice…. it’s exactly the kind of thing we need to know, and the math issue has already come up a few times. I actually think I can make it interesting, but we WILL make a concerted effort to teach it. I imagine that knowing applications is a big part of making it stick and also compatible with the basics of unschooling… i.e., rote memorizing the formulae around right triangles in trigonometry kind of goes nowhere, but knowing that you can use a transit to measure angles and determine the height of a tall pole without physically measuring it at least gives it a grounding in reality.

  13. Nice work, JBT!

  14. Yeah. With a capital Y!

    I am reminded that Courage is a muscle. Some people try to argue with me when I say that, and I listen, but they haven’t changed my mind.

    Fear isn’t deadly; letting fear paralyze you is deadly.

    It might start with just speaking up or asking a question when your heart is pounding out of your chest because you’re afraid people will think you’re stupid, or you’re afraid of rocking the boat. Speak up anyway.

    Exercise that muscle. Even that is Epic Shit.

    Until you find something that scares you more. But by then you’ll know it probably won’t kill you. So you can keep exercising that muscle.

    Thanks Johnny.

  15. Tammi Kibler says:

    Thank you so much, Johnny.

    I was on the phone today with a family member who was trying to convince me to give up and give in despite the evidence that my seeds are sprouting.

    So happy to have posts like this to remind me of what matters.

  16. Erica says:

    Well, I see that you’ve finally found the words. (And the right ones, too…which is the real trick!) I think it was worth the wait. =)

    You have an amazing ability to be brash and out LOUD, and gentle and deep all at the same time. “Epic” or not, it’s pretty awesome. I love it.

    I was homeschooled until 10th grade. If you want to chat sometime about my experience of being homeschooled, entering the public school system, and then going on to achieve the highest degree they offer, I’d be happy to share what I know. In short, I think you’re making a good decision, as long as you keep some structure in there, and as long as you don’t let them fall behind in the math (seconding Kate there).

    I’m about to jump into one of those “things that scares you” situations. Here goes nothing…

    • Johnny says:

      Yep, and thank you… I’m really not worried about education per se because I’m really confident in the notion that motivated, practical learning trumps standardized, “because we said to memorize it” learning any day. But I’m sure I’ll ask you about it eventually, yep…

  17. That was an epic post. So much so that now I I have to go and read the other post that started all this crusading talk and swearing and emotion and intent and motivating ra rah. I feel like going off to start a new country!

  18. John says:

    Epic? Outstanding? Just plain fucking awesome? This post was all three.

    Reminds me of “Our Deepest Fear”, the poem by Marianne Williamson.

    “Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It’s not just in some of us; it’s in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”

    Love it dude.

    • Johnny says:

      Yeah, I also love that passage. People tend to feel guilty when they do big things…

  19. Joel says:

    Find something you’re terrified of. Then go do it.

    Love it. Love it. Love it. See you in a few weeks Johnny!

  20. Hey Johnny,
    I get a lot of coaching students who expect me to tell them what to do. What I ask them is what do they think they should do and then I tell them to Fucking Do it.

  21. nmatusart says:

    rock ON! You gave me that kick that I needed to hear for so many reasons. Stuff I know I need to do, but scares the shit out of me. . . . . you gave me shot of Courage. Thanks!!!

  22. Mythic is better than epic.

  23. I used to feel like I was “faking it” until I realized that bravery doesn’t require fearlessness. Bravery just requires action, regardless of fear.

  24. I homeschooled our son for two years. My god, it was terrifying to make the decision to bring him home, then it was sheer hell for three months until I threw everything I thought I knew about education out the window and worked from his perspective. It was the most humbling experience (as is parenting in general.)

    The three months of hell was essential to learn what did work from learning what didn’t. And what didn’t work was Singapore Math despite everyone raving about it. So you just have to start with what ideas you have and course correct from there. And it’ll be fine. You are fortunate to have a very bright child, you don’t need to worry about him falling behind. You can’t really go wrong. Have a great time learning and being epic unschoolers!

    • Johnny says:

      That’s cool to hear. I suspect there’ll be a ton of learning on both sides, and I’m not going into it with a lot of “school of thought” plans, I don’t think, so hopefully it’ll be organic. Fingers crossed!

  25. This is great–just great stuff, have to say. I haven’t read over here in an age but reading this now after the Universe post and it’s just great. I totally get it but I can picture how some might not.

    Donated a mouthful of coffee to the monitor on this:

    “So how to do you become outstanding? How do you be epic? How do you be a seriously rad motherfucker? Well, Eleanor Roosevelt, who was a total punk rock surfer extreme motherfucker, said it this way:

    “You must do the thing you think you cannot do.”
    – Eleanor Roosevelt”

    It’s the switch or juxtaposition of language…there I was grooving on my native dialect and the rhythm and suddenly there’s this little old lady who was definitely punk in her way lmao

    I had to start skimming toward the end, out of time…did you mention “that which we resist persists?” I think Jung said that. You said “Do the thing that terrifies you.” That’s it. That’s what we have to do. Thanks so much for the reminder. Keep on, I’ll be reading! 🙂

    • Johnny says:

      I know I’ve mentioned the Jung quote before, but not in this one. I totally buy it. As hippieish as it sounds, it seems like “going with the flow” is honestly sometimes the best advice.

      (Ironically, “Rock the boat” is sometimes also good advice.)

  26. winn taylor says:

    Yup! Well done sir. There is a quote I heard in my early 20’s that has always stayed with me, “Courage is action in the face of fear”.
    Fear is simply a call to action…though the action might be run. Action none the less.

    • Johnny says:

      Right. Courage is not about the absence of fear at all… I think that’s what throws people.

  27. Lauren says:

    “It is better to be an imperfect version of yourself than a pale imitation of someone else.” “Do one thing every day that scares you”.

    I try to live by these two quotations. Thanks for the reminder!

  28. Angie says:

    I cannot stop laughing at Eleanor Roosevelt, the total punk rock surfer extreme motherfucker. The mental images are priceless.

    Thank you Johnny, for the entertainment, and for encouraging those of us who don’t see ourselves as traditional professionals to just be ourselves.

  29. Maira says:

    Oh my goddess! This post rocked my world like no post I’ve read in some time. My absolute fave line? This: “Amazing is not a set of accomplishments, it’s an attitude.” Righteous
    I’m working on putting together a personal development wilderness retreat and I am freaked out that no one will want to come, that I have nothing to offer clients and blah freaking blah. But I continue to do the planning, the visioning, and creating b/c while I’m not trying to be epic, I am wanting to feel it- and there is nothing like standing on a peak with a group of people who really want to be there too.

    Anyway, thanks. I am inspired this Monday morning, to continue doing the things that scare me.

  30. I had to walk away from this post twice because of my overwhelm of emotion…well-done.

    In Colorado, to those of us who work for one of the larger resort companies, EPIC is a dirty word – translated to “Every Prick in Colorado” who can, and now does, buy a ski pass and then corrupts our elitist slopes with their not-epicness. Read: jester hats, brown bag lunches and snollerblades. I’m as much of a prick for judging…

    I appreciate the term, and have even adopted the similar “kick ass” in my blog. Perhaps one day when I grow up I will adopt a better metaphor, but for now it fits.

    Every reader finds in a blog/ book/ article what he/she is inclined to find, or what he/she is looking for. The Ayn Rand books appeal to and appall me on so many different levels. I once compared her to Emerson. Thank God I had a forgiving professor…

    Thanks for even more great stuff. Keep killing it!

    -Heather

    • Johnny says:

      Yep… remember the IDEA behind the word rather than what it’s been turned into, if what it’s become in your experience is bad. Same idea with punk rock and poseurs, right? If you dug Green Day in 1994 and are appalled by some of the douches who are into them today, should you stop liking Green Day because of it? Doesn’t make much sense.

  31. ELisha Vee says:

    DUDE – did you just call me a PUNK??? Cause if you did, then THANK YOU! I needed that! So… I guess I’d better rehearse for this audition. And finish this book. Durn!

  32. Kyeli says:

    Feel the fear, then go do it. But fear creates resistance, and the resistance can eat our souls/lives/time/what-have-you. That Big Thing of Epic Awesome that rocks our socks and scares the bejeezus out of us is probably smooshed down deep beneath the giant behemoth of resistance.

    So… do you have some concrete suggestions for how to do it anyway?

    • Johnny says:

      Yeah, but you’re not going to like it. 🙂

      Q: How do you do it anyway?

      A: Do it. Anyway.

      We can analyze to death, but ultimately you just have to leap. (Oh, and read The War of Art. Again if needed.)

  33. Margie says:

    Some people I know of, who aren’t even close to the most intelligent I know, but who are constantly following their dreams, came up with the following line, which I think sums up a lot here. “Turn the fear of the unknown into the excitement of the potential”.
    They were referring to psyching themselves up to ride ridiculous sized and potentially deadly waves, that would punctuate their short time on the planet with an adrenalin rush and feeling of being alive that few get to experience.
    I love that people arrive to similar destinations by all kinds of routes 🙂

    • Johnny says:

      That last sentence is especially poignant. I had a “peaceful cage match” with Pace from connection-revolution.com that resulted in exactly the same final assessment… her approach was kinder and gentler, yes, but we’re both on the same page about getting all of us unstuck and “awake”!

  34. James says:

    Bro.. seriously … this was the MOST funny article i had in 2013. Just hope you get a basket full of teens in heat for your next B-day.. you worked yer ass for it.. you deserve it ! This is real stand up comedy online fo’ sho’ !

    We all tend to be.. serious all the times.. and we lose that one thing that we love when watching movies.. “what other people do” .. That is what drives the human race it seems.. Ease the fuck up all .. life goes for like this.

    Born. Cry. Eat. Cry. LoL. Wonder. Discover. LoL. Cry. Cry, Cry. LoL. Fuck. Discover. Realize. Die. – NOT for all of us. If you did at least ONE of those.. be happy when you die.

    Rest is pure mindfuck

  35. Dan says:

    Fantastic post and so glad I found your site! I actually discovered your’s and Joel Runyon’s sites after subscribing to the ‘Bigger, Better, Faster, Stronger’ podcast. I’m just soaking it up man. Soaking it up and preparing to make my move and take my stand. By the way – laughed my ass off at this: “Becoming a bitchin’ ultimately awesome shit-kicking badass just like Eleanor fucking Roosevelt fuck yeah” ! Truly legendary! 🙂

  36. Ferrous says:

    This is awesome

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